September 1: Orientation

September 1: Orientation

Introductions
Syllabus Review
Getting our Bearings

  • Robert W. Karrow, Jr., Introduction to James R. Ackerman & Robert W. Karrow, Jr., Eds., Maps: Finding Our Place in the World (Chicago: University of Chicago Press & The Field Museum, 2007): 1-12.
  • Aaron Reiss, “My 5 Favorite Maps: Bill RankinThe Atlantic CityLab (September 26, 2014). See also Bill’s top-10 list.

References & Inspiration: I’ll bring these books to class so we can look through them. I’ve also request that copies of (almost) all of these titles be placed on reserve in the TNS Library; I encourage you to reference them throughout the semester.

  • Katharine Harmon, You Are Here: Personal Geographies and Other Maps of the Imagination (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2004): maps of the body and spirit, maps of emotion and memory, maps of fictional places and cosmology, maps of air routes and stereotypes
  • David Macaulay, Underground (Boston; Houghton Mifflin, 1976).
  • Liza Mogel & Alexis Bhagat, Eds., An Atlas of Radical Cartography (Los Angeles: The Journal of Aesthetics Protest Press, 2008).
  • Hans Ulrich Obrist, Ed., Mapping It Out: An Alternative Atlas of Contemporary Cartographies (London: Thames & Hudson, 2014): cartographic artwork, classified by theme: redrawn territories, charting human life, scientia naturalis, invented worlds, and the unmappable
  • Seth Robbins and Robert Neuwirth, Mapping New York (London: Black Dog, 2009): maps of the city’s evolution and its services, travel maps, maps of the urban imagination
  • Rebecca Solnit, Infinite City: A San Francisco Atlas (Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2010): maps of indigenous spaces, open spaces, post-industrial spaces, film locations, racial justice, butterfly habitats, shipyard sounds, murders, evictions, coffee, military-industrial think tanks, remembered identities, and more
  • Nato Thompson, Experimental Geography: Radical Approaches to Landscape, Cartography, and Urbanism (Brooklyn: Melville House, 2008).
  • Visual Editions, Ed., Where You Are: A Book Of Maps That Will Leave You Completely Lost (London: Visual Editions, 2013) [see also the lovely print edition]*
  • Denis Wood and John Fels, The Natures of Maps: Cartographic Constructions of the Natural World (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008): 6-16, 26-28, 31-32.
  • Denis Wood, Everything Sings: Maps for a Narrative Atlas (Los Angeles: Siglio, 2010).