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Comments for Media and Architecture 2012 http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring A Graduate Seminar in Media Studies at The New School. Taught by Shannon Mattern. Sat, 12 May 2012 14:16:59 -0400 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.3 Comment on Aitken/Pitchfork “Happening” @ Hirshhorn, 5/11 by hbliss http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1551#comment-2801 Sat, 12 May 2012 14:16:59 +0000 http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1551#comment-2801 love this!

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Comment on Reading response Wk 13 by shannon http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1515#comment-2293 Wed, 25 Apr 2012 02:53:28 +0000 http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1515#comment-2293 Lovely, Alex. It’s been such a pleasure to take a little peek inside your mind — to observe how you’re processing and creatively synthesizing these various readings — each week. Ackerman and Hill (and even Bredehof, in his discussion of the 3D cut-outs in Ware’s comics) would agree with you that the materiality of these drawings is significant — and not only for nostalgic purposes. The specific drawing substrate to some degree informed what kinds of forms were drawn on it. And several of this week’s authors suggest that there’s much to be learned by regarding old drawings — perhaps even those marked VOID — as historical documents that can help us peek inside the minds of architects past, and better understand their habits of mind.

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Comment on Reading Response Week 13 – Drawing by shannon http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1512#comment-2292 Wed, 25 Apr 2012 02:45:44 +0000 http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1512#comment-2292 Thanks, Matt, for your sixth and final post! I’m glad to see these questions regarding the “ontology of the image” re-emerging here. If I remember correctly, you addressed similar issues during our weeks on photography and Le Corbusier (who of course believed that “inaccurate” representations better captured his designs). The flexibility of drawing gives us lots of room to play with space and time.

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Comment on Architectural drawing by shannon http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1510#comment-2291 Wed, 25 Apr 2012 02:39:09 +0000 http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1510#comment-2291 Thanks, Anna! I’m glad you point out how different drawing media can not only convey different spatial qualities within the drawing itself, but can also have an impact on the character of the buildings they represent. The use of different media might not depend solely on the purpose of a drawing, though; couldn’t it also be determined by the personal style of an architect? A lot of Ackerman’s and Hewitt’s examples refer to the preferred media or various architects, and the parallels we can detect in their design styles.

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Comment on Reading Response: Week 13: Signs, Signals, and Signifiers by shannon http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1502#comment-2290 Wed, 25 Apr 2012 02:36:12 +0000 http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1502#comment-2290 Some interesting ideas here, Namreta; you’ve taken some *very* general ideas from the readings as a starting point to explore some disparate ideas. Most of what you offer here is more “inspired by” the readings than directly *addressing* the readings. I wonder about this: “While tools have changed over the years, much of the language of drawing and representation has stayed the same.” Ackerman and Hewitt and even Hill suggest that the tools do make a difference. I wonder what you think about this.

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Comment on Tania Zarak – Week 13 by shannon http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1491#comment-2289 Wed, 25 Apr 2012 02:30:06 +0000 http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1491#comment-2289 Thanks, Tania, for your sixth and final post! There certainly are parallels between Hewitt’s proposed methods for studying drawing, and how we might study the work of a filmmaker or video game designer. It goes to show that the general, abstract stages of creation might be consistent across time — but the variety of tools and technologies we have access to, the the different cultural and historical contexts within which we use them, dramatically alter what emerges from the creative process.

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Comment on Reading Response Week 12 – Architecture, Print, and Abstraction by shannon http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1236#comment-1816 Wed, 18 Apr 2012 01:32:38 +0000 http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1236#comment-1816 Wow — epic post, Alex!

I was very happy to read your argument — in response to Hugo’s claim that the printing press “converts itself into a flock of birds, scatters itself to the four winds, and occupies all points of air and space at once”: — that “[h]e could just as easily be talking about radio or television or the Internet – disseminating ideas through the ether. And similarly, with each new communication technology, there are both celebrations of new possibilities, and concerns about the increased removal from “real,” “authentic” interaction.” EXACTLY! This is in part why we’ve been moving backward in time throughout the semester — so we can historicize similar claims made about *digital* technologies (…and television, and film, and photography…) revolutionizing architecture. We say the same things every time! And as you say, every time, there are both celebrations of new possibilities and concerns over what might be lost.

We can talk tomorrow about whether Koolhaas and Ingels propose any particularly compelling “new possibilities” for books, for buildings, and for books about buildings.

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Comment on This will kill That by shannon http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1207#comment-1815 Wed, 18 Apr 2012 01:24:29 +0000 http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1207#comment-1815 Thanks, Anna, for reminding us that printing itself is not an a-historical practice. It, too, is subject to change — just as architecture is! I wonder what you make of the distinctive material qualities of Koolhaas’s books (which Foster wrote about, and which I’ll bring to class tomorrow), or Bjarke Ingels’s archi-comic (which comes in iPad app form)? Through what processes of production are *these* publications made — and how might we draw parallels to contemporary architectural production?

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Comment on Reading Response Week 12: This Will Kill That by shannon http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1203#comment-1813 Wed, 18 Apr 2012 01:19:02 +0000 http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1203#comment-1813 Another thoughtful response, Matt. I especially appreciate your “discussion prompt” in the final paragraph; I hope we’ll can spend some time discussing Hugo’s glimmer of optimism in class tomorrow. Is architecture’s “revival” marked by the steel skyscraper? Or is it the shopping mall, or “Bigness,” as Koolhaas proposes (discussed in the Foster reading)? Or is it Bjarke Ingels’s style of “BIGness” (as proposed in his comic)?

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Comment on Reading Response, April 17, 2012 by shannon http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1192#comment-1812 Wed, 18 Apr 2012 01:12:08 +0000 http://www.wordsinspace.net/media-architecture/2012-spring/?p=1192#comment-1812 Thanks, Nikolas. You’re certainly right that the focus on print’s “negative” impact on architecture — “just as considering the web being responsible for the end of the printing press”– is “too narrow minded.” Since we’ve been moving backwards in time throughout the semester, we’ve heard repeated predictions that new media forms will kill — or at least dramatically alter — architecture and our conceptions of space. Those changes are, as we’ve seen over the past few weeks, always varied — both “positive” and “negative.” And as the final short readings for this week show, architects certainly haven’t killed *print*: they’re still publishing massive tomes! But to what end, we might wonder?

I also appreciate your comment at the end about architecture having “its own language.” Do you think that language evolves as the cultural and technological ecologies evolve around it? Is *today’s* architectural “language” different than it would’ve been in Hugo’s day — before the rise of the mechanically reproduced image?

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