process-post number 5: reflections on reflexion.

How fitting that my project has to do with time and I’m late in submitting this reflective blog entry (and as per digital media, I will “forever” be reminded of this lateness due to the timestamp below)

Anyways-

This is the sort of class I wish I’d taken my first semester at the New School as it forced me, more than any other class, to reflect on methodology itself. I’m sure that if I had taken this class a year and a half ago I would’ve spent a lot of my time in this program making maps.

Mapping my research aided me in understanding some of the dense theoretical concepts I’ve been exploring in my “free” time, so in a reflective sense, I am indebted to the project if only because it helped me understand some things.  I am hoping some of this translated its way onto the map itself, as again, a major impetus behind the project was experimenting with ways in which these kinds of dense theoretical concepts can be made more easily accessible.

This is but a beginning (in the series of ever-perpetual “starts” that is intellectual effort), and I plan to utilize the URT as I move forward in my own explorations.

Through trial-and-error (and error and error and error…), the entire mapping process has indeed been a challenge, but in the most productive sense of the term.   In making visible our research (and the research process itself), the “holes” in particular theories become visually evident.  Inasmuch as mapping has allowed me to further “understand” some things, it’s also shown me what’s missing (per my philosophic speculation).

I was mainly disappointed with the sonic aspect of my project.  Time and Space got in the way of that (bad pun acknowledged).  And I’m not sure if I adequately got across what I was going for in my presentation, though I think I did?    In trying to break things apart in an attempt at simplicity one can often just complicate things – regardless, it fell short but I was able to at least explore some things that don’t necessarily work that well.  Again: a work in progress.

Another thing I’ve learned is that deadlines are a good thing.  They ensure that you get things done.

The different forms assumed by each individual’s map serve as a source of inspiration for continued experimentation.  Now that I have the time, I look forward to looking though each project in detail.

Overall: a most productive experience, and one that will inform future work.

Thanks so much for such a stimulating semester-

2 comments

  • Oh yeah, and here’s at least one way in which Harman breaks from Latour: though both are primarily focused on objects and their relations, Latour tends to treat his objects as eternal entities whereas Harman staunchly opposes such a notion, arguing instead for eternal FORMS (and his neo-Platonism is intended as he proceeds to emphatically endorse “essence”) but never eternal objects which, for him, are only ever IN RELATION, thus always changing and never “just one thing.”

  • Poignant as usual, Louis.

    This is the kind of confession that would make any (non-positivist) teacher proud: “In making visible our research (and the research process itself), the “holes” in particular theories become visually evident. Inasmuch as mapping has allowed me to further “understand” some things, it’s also shown me what’s missing (per my philosophic speculation).” Pardon me, while I wipe away a tear.