Category Archives: Events

via NYU-A/P/A

Index of the Disappeared Opening Reception, February 13

[via NYU-APA] “An Index can be a trace, a signpost, an indicator or a measurement. Our Index begins in the gaps where language ends; that is in the records of absence and absences of records where official language fails and new languages must be developed in its place,” explain Chitra Ganesh and Mariam Ghani, the 2013-2014 A/P/A Artists-in-Residence, whose installation Index of the Disappeared: Secrets Told opens at the A/P/A Institute gallery with a reception on Thursday, February 13.

Index of the Disappeared: Secrets Told is a site-specific installation of images, sound, texts, and documents related to leak prosecutions, the surveillance state, and the uses and abuses of isolation in the prison-industrial complex. The installation is on view at the A/P/A Institute gallery February 10-Friday, March 21, 2014, 11AM-5PM, Monday-Friday.

Read more about Index of the Disappeared.

RSVP by Tuesday, February 11.

Chitra Ganesh was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, where she currently lives and works. Her drawing, installation, text-based work, and collaborations seek to excavate and circulate buried narratives typically excluded from official canons of history, literature, and art.

Mariam Ghani was born in New York and lives in Brooklyn. Her research-based practice spans video, installation, performance, photography, and text, and operates at the intersections between place, memory, history, language, loss, and reconstruction.

Via Pulitzer Center

Radical Archives Conference @ NYU, April 11-12

Radical Archives is a two-day conference, presented by the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU, organized around the notion of archiving as a radical practice. An international contingent of archivists, artists, artist-archivists, activist archivists, theorists and scholars working within a range of archives and archival practices will be invited to present and discuss archives of radical politics and  practices; archives that are radical / experimental in form or function; how archiving in itself might be a radical act in certain moments or contexts; and how archives can be active in the present, as well as documents of the past or scripts for the future. 
The conference will be organized around four major themes, include a number of presentation formats, and be supplemented by / documented through an online catalogue. We are calling for contributions relevant to these themes. Proposed formats could include panels, roundtables, individual papers or artist talks, performances or performance-lectures, screenings, interactive screen-based projects or live participatory projects.

Archive and Affect
Possible topics could include, but are not limited to: embodied / performed archives; archive and repertory; buildings as archives; oral and informal histories; private versus public archives, and transitions between those states; warm versus cold data

Archiving Around Absence
Possible topics could include, but are not limited to: disappearing archives; deliberately destroyed archives; inadvertently preserved archives, or unofficial histories within official histories; reading for the shadows; strategies of resistant or counter-archiving

Archives and Ethics
Possible topics could include, but are not limited to: stealing from archives; stealing as the foundation of archives; strategies of refusal or resistance to archiving; ownership of archived testimonies; intellectual property versus intellectual propriety; the afterlives of archives designed for specific purposes, e.g. archives of protests, activist movements, and human rights initiatives; the ethics of open access; FOIA and its discontents

Archive as Constellation
Possible topics could include, but are not limited to: archive as method; the artist’s archive; the expanded archival field or notion of the archive; linking of archives across networks; film as archive; subversive or experimental uses of metadata, cataloguing and classification; archive and database, database and interface; how standards and interfaces shape our understanding of collections and the information they contain